Evening and part time courses

Studying evening or part time courses can be a way for you to study although you have a job or if you are studying something else. It can also be a way for you to try out a subject through an indroductory course, or give you a possibility to immerse in a field. 

In biology, there are a number of courses given in 50% speed and 30% speed, and we have courses in both advanced and basic level. Some of the courses are evening courses, some are part time courses and some courses are web based with no or a few mandatory lectures, seminars or workshops.

Distance courses

Autumn 2021

Bioinformatic analyses I 5 credits - 1BG311
The course has a content that everyone working with molecular data – and almost every biologist will at one time or another - needs. It focuses on comparative sequence analyses (DNA/RNA and protein) and public data-bases. It comprises the content, tools and interfaces of public databases on the Internet (e.g. GenBank, KEGG, UniProt) – mainly through web interfaces. Furthermore, you learn how fragments (from the sequencer) are assembled into a contig, how genes are identified in sequence data, and how sequences are aligned in order to compare them.

Bioinformatics on the web 5 credits - 1BG425
This course is a completely web-based course that provides opportunities to try a number of tools, which are publicly available on the Internet, primarily to study and interpret sequence data from DNA and proteins. The course is intended as a first introduction to give a taste of what some of the available bioinformatics tools can be used for. Areas of application include: Databases and searches in data-bases. Interpretation of genomic sequence patterns. Alignment of DNA sequences and phylogenetic inference. Metabolic reconstructions. Secondary and three-dimensional structures of proteins.

The Baltic Sea Environment, 10 credits - 1BG405
The aim of the course is to give basic knowledge of the ecosystem and the environmental conditions of the Baltic Sea. Special attention is given to human induced problems in the Baltic Sea as well as to restoration measures to improve the environmental situation. 


Spring 2022

Bioinformatics on the web 5 credits - 1BG425
This course is a completely web-based course that provides opportunities to try a number of tools, which are publicly available on the Internet, primarily to study and interpret sequence data from DNA and proteins. The course is intended as a first introduction to give a taste of what some of the available bioinformatics tools can be used for. Areas of application include: Databases and searches in data-bases. Interpretation of genomic sequence patterns. Alignment of DNA sequences and phylogenetic inference. Metabolic reconstructions. Secondary and three-dimensional structures of proteins.

Bioinformatic analyses IIa 5 credits - 1BG337
This course builds on Bioinformatic Analyses I and primarily focuses on bioinformatic analyses in evolutionary biology. The course primarily deals with phylogenetic analysis in a wide sense, but also multivariate statistics, geographic information systems (GIS), and usage of databases for biodiversity studies.

Evening courses

Autumn 2021

The Baltic Sea Environment 10 credits - 1BG405
The aim of the course is to give basic knowledge of the ecosystem and the environmental conditions of the Baltic Sea. Special attention is given to the problems connected with the Baltic Sea environment as well as to the restoration measures in order to improve the environmental situation. The course is interdisciplinary integrating questions of biodiversity, eutrophication, fisheries, toxins, and global warming. Moreover, restoration measures will be discussed from biological, technical, legal, as well as economical points of view. The course includes an excursion to the Baltic Sea, and a study visit to a work facility related to the Baltic Sea environment.

Biomolecular archaeology, 2 credits - 1BL809
The course is a comprehensive introduction to biomolecular archaeology, focusing on methods and practices most relevant for professionals and researchers working with the human past from a variety of disciplines within the humanities and social sciences (e.g., archaeology, heritage sector) and the natural sciences (e.g., biology, palaeontology, environment, forensics). It provides hands-on practice through case studies and theme workshops in a multidisciplinary environment. The course is designed to be subject immersive and to complement the skills and specialised expertise of each student.

Frontiers in Bioscience 10 credits - 1BG044
Scientific hypotheses and theories. DNA and its function. Revolutionary breakthroughs in genetic engineering and synthetic biology. Use of CRISPR in gene therapy and genetically modified organisms (GMO). Research and applications in cancer therapy and stem cells.

Human Evolution: an Overview, 10 credits - 1BG046
The course provides a basic knowledge of human evolution and prehistory. We will study the latest findings from genetic research on human evolution, how the genome works in humans, how genomic variation is investigated and analysed. We will also focus on man's closest relatives, such as Neanderthals and archaic groups from the Homo genus, partly from a fossil and archaeological perspective, and partly from a genetic perspective. We will discuss questions about when and where modern man originated? What genes have changed during human evolution?

Human Security and Sustainable Development in Tropical Ecosystems, 10 credits - 1BG428
Tropical ecosystems house the majority of Earth's biodiversity and human population, and provide immense benefits to humans at both local and global scales. At the same time, tropical ecosystems face major challenges including climate change, poverty, political instability, and resource exploitation. These threats pose risks for human security and sustainable development. This course will provide a cross-disciplinary overview of ecological, social, and policy perspectives in tropical socio-ecological systems.

Spring 2022

Ecological effects of climate changes 10 credits - 1BG417
In this course fundamental ecological principles relevant to present-day Climate Change are introduced. The aim is to give students with a background in science, humanities, economics, as well as social, technical and political sciences the necessary biological knowledge to enable them to participate in the debate and management of Climate Change issues. The over-arching question is how changes in climate affect biological processes from the level of individuals up to ecosystems. The course will develop the mechanistic understanding of how changes in the climate affect species and ecosystems, and how ecosystem processes in turn affect the climate.

Faunistics, vertebrates 10 credits - 1BG222
This course provides advanced knowledge of vertebrates, with an emphasis on species knowledge and practical skills to identify vertebrate species in the field in Sweden. The course includes species identification of almost all Swedish vertebrates, as well as knowledge of their distribution, habitat requirements and general biology (feeding habits, tracks, sounds, movement and nesting ecology). Parts of the exams will be held in the field.

Modelling in biology 5 hp - 1BG383
In this course, you will learn how to build, analyse and interpret mathematical models that are motivated by questions from ecology and evolutionary biology. More specifically, you will learn standard population dynamical and population genetics models and the necessary mathematical tools to analyse them. The course consists of lectures, home assignments and tutorials and you might want to take it while doing your degree project. Home assignments consist of problems that can be solved with paper and pencil and of problems for which mathematical software packages are necessary.

Last modified: 2021-04-14